How Can I Protect My Stained Glass from Hail Damage?

Posted August 29th, 2019 by ssgadmin
stained glass hail damage colorado springs

Hail is every Coloradan’s worst enemy. Hail here can be either super small and fine so that it almost looks like snow or the totally opposite and the size of marbles or even golf balls. You never know what you’re going to get.

But if it is a bad hail storm, you can expect the worst. Colorado hail can destroy car windshields, skylights, and basically anything else in its path. This includes stained glass windows.

If you’re worried about hail damage, you may be wondering, is there anything I can do to protect my stained glass? We asked our experts at Scottish Stained Glass and this is what they told us.

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What’s the Best Way to Clean Stained Glass?

Posted August 24th, 2019 by ssgadmin

Maintaining your stained glass can lengthen times between restoration and provide better antique value in the long run. Proper care and maintenance are crucial to keeping your stained glass in good condition. Cleaning your stained glass windows regularly is really important. During all of our experiences with restoration, we always see how much debris and dirt can get built up on these windows over a centuries time. Don’t let the beauty of your expensive stained glass become hidden– learn how to properly care for and clean your stained glass windows!

Proper Maintenance and Cleaning Tips for Stained Glass Windows

We recommend cleaning your stained glass window every week or two weeks. You’ll be surprised how much can accumulate in such a short period of time. Always use a neutral PH soap when cleaning your stained glass– never use Windex or other cleaning agents. Traditional cleaners can cause lead or zinc framing to oxidize faster. Most cleaning detergents contain ammonia which can create numerous structural issues in your stained glass window. Always use a soft rag that’s not abrasive to make sure you don’t scratch the surface of your glass. When cleaning, make sure to mix warm water with the neutral PH soap to create an even milder solution that’s gentle and effective.

Work with Houston’s Preferred Stained Glass Studio

Scottish Stained Glass is proud to be the preferred stained glass studio offering comprehensive repair and restoration services. Regular maintenance and cleaning give you the opportunity to check on the condition of your stained glass. This provides proactive opportunities to discover if your stained glass needs any repairs or restoration. We’re always here to provide any maintenance and proper care advice that you need.

For more information regarding the best way to clean your Houston stained glass windows, please contact us!

When should Stained Glass Be Restored?

Posted August 23rd, 2019 by ssgadmin

Knowing when it is time to replace or restore your Dallas Church’s stained glass is not intuitive. Many parishioners do not notice anything wrong with their stained glass–except maybe it looks a little dingy. Which is why we urge you to get your church’s stained glass inspected by a professional.  However, there are ways to do an initial inspection yourself to let you know if it may be time to have them restored. When it comes to whether or not a chapel’s stained glass windows need repair we tell our potential clients to refer to the two A’s–Age and Appearance. Read on to find out how to use these two simple reference points can tell you a lot about your stained glass.

Consider the Appearance of Your Church’s Stained Glass

How your Dallas church’s stained or painted glass windows looks will tell you a lot about its state of repair. There are a lot of visual cues coming from it that will not only tell you whether it needs repair but why and what is happening below the surface that you may not realize. So, to help you understand what to look for we have collated a complete list of seven common signs you glass likely needs repair.

Appearance: 7 Top Signs of Stained Glass Deterioration

  1.  Sagging or Bulging Glass: Walk up to your stained glass window as close as you can get. Peer up at the window and panes of glass. Do you see any bulging? Do any of the panes of the window appear to have a concave or convex appearance? Stand at a distance from your stained glass and look at the horizontal lines–are they all even? If any of these are true your window could be suffering from wind damage or structural decay.
  2. Dull or Faded Looking Stained Glass: Can you see excessive dirt build-up between the lead and the glass? Do the colors appear muted? Or. does the light look weak beaming through? This could mean a lifetime of grime is on your Dallas church’s stained glass windows–inside and out. Many things “stick” to glass over time: environmental debris, dirt, grease, and even improper cleaners that may have been used. DIY cleaning alone in these cases is likely not enough.
  3. Cracked Stained Glass Panels: Feel free to get as close as you can and look closely as the glass. Many times cracks will radiate from attachment points. This is from the movement of the supporting structures, especially wooden ones, over time. Other cracks, in the middle of the glass panes, likely came from damage from its surroundings. Things like hail, tree branches or even an accidental bump from someone or something inside causes these. While small cracks are fairly innocuous, over time the glass pieces will rub against each other and exponentially increase the damage and need for repair.
  4. Gaps In The Glass: When looking for gaps in the glass, a good time to look is in the early evening with the lights off. When you get close the stained glass you will be able to see daylight streaming through more brightly through gaps around the frames of the affected panel. These gaps mean the glass has shifted with the movement of the frame. In some cases may have even broken off completely in those areas.
  5. Detached or Failing Frames or Support Structures: Carefully inspect all the support structures around the window. There should not be any steel bars showing or protruding. Likewise, if you have wood framing the panels, which is broken or missing–you have severe structural damage. Since these are the structures actually keeping your very heavy glass in place–you definitely need to shore up these supports at the very least.
  6. Soft Lead: If you can access the stained glass of your Dallas cathedral–go up to it and carefully squeeze various parts of the lead beading. If the lead is soft it is degraded and could bend under the weight of the glass causing sagging. In fact, this type of damage almost always accompanies sagging or bulging glass. *Lead is a toxic substance so we suggest wearing gloves if you want to do this yourself. Calling a professional to deal with any sort of lead caming is the best/safest option.
  7. Cracked Lead: If you look at the leading on your stained glass windows and see cracks or missing pieces of lead–your window needs to be re-leaded. The stained glass on your window is actually the strongest part. When stained glass windows need restoration, almost all issues stem from the degradation of the lead, since glass itself really doesn’t “degrade”.

Age:  Why it Matter To The State of Your Dallas Church’s Stained Glass

we are at an interesting era of stained glass history. This is because a large proportion of stained glass in churches–here in Dallas and across the United States– are reaching the outer limits of their life. You see, stained glass created at the turn and the beginning of the last century lasts about 80-100 years before needing repair. Since it is 2019–this means now. Churches, especially those west of the Mississippi river were primarily built around this time. So if your Dallas church is older or historic and has stained glass windows–it is likely time to have them repaired.

Whether because of age or any of the seven appearance signs of degradation– if any of these criteria apply to your church it is time to call in a professional. Reach out to us at Scottish Stained Glass in Dallas to schedule a free on-site assessment for your church today!

Why Is Stained Glass So Common in Churches?

Posted August 21st, 2019 by ssgadmin
why is stained glass common for churches

Many of us are amazed by the beauty of stained glass windows. When you walk into a church with colored glass windows, you can’t help but stop and stare. All of the colors and the magnificent rays of light shining through are quite a spectacle. But how did leaded glass windows come to be such a common part of churches? The answer may surprise you. Here’s a little bit of information about the history and meaning behind church stained glass.

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What Are the Different Types of Stained Glass?

Posted August 17th, 2019 by ssgadmin

When people think about stained glass, they typically picture colorful, traditional windows found in churches. Some people may be aware that there are different types of stained glass available, ranging from leaded, clear glass to traditional. Even fewer people may realize that there are actually 20 different types of stained glass! Here are some of our favorites:

The Different Types of Stained Glass

  1. Architectural: characterized as smooth on one side and textured on the other.
  2. Cathedral: translucent in nature, cathedral stained glass is typically made in one color and can be blown or machine rolled.
  3. Semi-antique: translucent, machine-made glass that has a consistent thickness and surface striations.
  4. Full-antique: handmade stained glass that’s translucent with rich colors, often having trapped air bubbles and pockets.
  5. Flashed: this antique glass has a second layer of color over a base color that can be exposed through etching or sandblasting to create a design.
  6. Craquel: referring to full-antique stained glass that’s been dipped in cool water to cause an exterior layer of glass to intentionally crack for an alligator pattern.
  7. Fractures and steamers: also known as confetti glass, the shards of colored glass and thin glass rods create an opal or clear base.
  8. Glue chip: artisans utilize an animal hide glue to apply cathedral glass that’s sandblasted on one side and uses a special technique to tear flakes away to create a pattern.
  9. Iridescent: opalescent or cathedral glass that’s coated with a thin layer of metallic salts for a shimmer effect.
  10. Mirror: colored art glass and clear float glass are coated with a reflective layer.
  11. Opaque: great for stained glass mosaics, can feature one or more colors.
  12. Opalescent: milky, luminescent glass.
  13. Ring mottled: opalescent glass with hazy surface.
  14. Streaky: swirls of color not mixed together.
  15. Seedy: cathedral glass with smooth surface and small air bubbles.

Work with Denver’s Trusted Stained Glass Studio

Scottish Stained Glass has decades of custom stained glass experience and can help you achieve anything. Contact us today!

 

 

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